The Myth of Better

The Myth of Better

Photography would not exist without technology; without innovation this art form would never exist, and with camera companies replacing cameras bodies every few years (and in some cases within months)  the possibilities for photographers, bloggers and camera enthusiasts are becoming endless. 

In a creative pursuit this can actually be a hindrance; it takes time to understand a medium, it takes even longer to master it. Yet today most professional photographers change cameras every 2 years (and in my experience more often). 

To try to combat this trend I tried using film cameras, working with lenses designed in the 1950s and 1960s. I learned to love how it felt to take the pictures, I knew exactly how each lens would render my images. Over time, however, it became clear that as much as people may say differently, film is a medium that will not be around forever and I slowly began to realise that I had to move back to digital photography.

I remember building my first computer with my granddad when I was 8, and from then on I loved technology.

When I finally hung up my film cameras and moved back to digital cameras, I found myself getting caught up in the buzz of online publications looking to entice us into buying their new, best camera. 

This is my attempt at saying enough is enough. I'm tired of 'better', I'm tired of new. I want to further my art without more technology, to invest in tools that will last longer than the few years they are designed to hold our interest.  

To forget 'better', to focus on the craft.  

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